As an industry leader with years of field experience and technical knowledge, we know it is our duty to show how sustainable forestry results in healthier forests and thriving wildlife. 

On the battleground of media sound bites, our industry is trying to fight a barrage of misleading messages like "go paperless, save a tree" with our own declarations and one-liners. Offense. Defense. With every parcel of truth, myths and misinformation abound and no one seems to take the time to engage in meaningful dialogue.

As an industry leader with years of field experience and technical knowledge, we know it is our duty to show how sustainable forestry results in healthier forests and thriving wildlife.

True to our eQ promise, herein we present the facts and science behind sustainable forestry practices. So that you'll feel confident using certified and controlled paper products, we've approached this complex issue of managing natural resources by sharing multiple perspectives. You'll learn from Sappi foresters, an academician, a conservationist, and a third-generation logger—experts who bring to life the true benefits of managing a forest. You'll also hear the voice of the customer from Hans Wegner, Chief Sustainability Officer for the National Geographic Society, who touches on all the complex social and environmental issues surrounding the pulp and paper industry.

There is not a single matter related to paper use that touches each of us personally and emotionally as forestry. Simply put—people love trees. It troubles me that some people envision responsible paper manufacturers as engaging in deforestation when, in fact, our suppliers are harvesting sustainably with a keen vigilance about promoting the regener-ation that keeps forests thriving. This type of forward thinking not only helps create habitats for animals that call these woodlands home but also ensures clean air, protected soil, better water quality and the promotion of biodiversity. Many people assume the best thing for a forest is to leave it in its natural state, yet few understand that variation in age class within a forest helps to promote biodiversity of both plant and animal species.

Within the following pages you'll read about where our wood comes from, the types of trees that are harvested and why these particular species are selected for our mills. All forests are managed either by Mother Nature or by humans—and it's often the case that human management is better for the long-term health of the forests.

We are proud of the fact that selling pulp and paper products is our business. We strive to be a profitable, global leader within our industry, while being vigilant about using sustainably harvested wood with high levels of certification—SFI®, PEFC and FSC®. Sappi does not promote wasteful consumption of resources—renewable or otherwise. We want our customers to use paper wisely and purposefully. And we also want to create an understanding that one need not feel guilty about the impact on the forest when products are sourced responsibly. As an industry, we must strive to meet society's needs for wood and paper products. But it is not just about meeting that demand—good forest management is about making forests better.

Laura M. Thompson, PhD

Director of Technical Marketing
and Sustainable Development

Sappi Fine Paper North America

The sustainable management of forests creates more trees, saves animals—all while preserving the longevity and biodiversity of our timberlands; that's why there are now more trees in the U.S. than 100 years ago.

To read the full story, download the PDF.

The native animal and fish species in the United States are dependent on trees for habitat, food and clean water. And trees are just as dependent on animals for dispersing seeds, fertilizing soil and transferring pollen. Which is why our industry has been especially vigilant in wildlife conservation.

To read the full story, download the PDF.

To allow forests and everything connected to them to reap the benefits of these nature tree-culling events without experiencing the negative effects, Sappi employs a very conscious and respectful system of forest management.

To read the full story, download the PDF.

National Geographic's Chief Sustainably Officer has a first-hand understanding of the state of the forest industry. He has a keen awareness of how the printing and publishing business has been targeted around the issues of trees, but is quick to point out how the sustainable practices of paper companies like Sappi are supplying sufficient new trees to be sustainable and achieving carbon sequestration.

To read the full story, download the PDF.

Get the answers to four key questions around sustainable forestry and the use of paper from Laura Thompson, Sappi's Director of Technical Marketing and Sustainable Development.

To read the full story, download the PDF.


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